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Coca-Cola Launches First Ever Alcoholic Beverage

Coca-Cola Launches First Ever Alcoholic Beverage


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It’s called Lemon-Do, and you can only get it in Japan

Coca-Cola has released the first ever alcoholic beverage in its 132-year history, but it’s exclusive to the Japanese market.

The first alcoholic Coca-Cola beverage has officially been launched. According to the BBC, the drinks are meant to compete with other popular Japanese drinks known as chuhai. These drinks, often marketed as “chu-hi” and named for a contraction of “shochu highball,” are canned mixtures of the traditional grain-based alcohol and flavored carbonated water.

Lemon-Do is the first alcoholic beverage Coca-Cola has sold in its 132-year history. It comes in three different levels of booziness and two flavors: Shoppers can select 3-percent, 5-percent, or 7-percent alcohol in either salty lemon or honey and lemon, according to The Wall Street Journal.

“We’ve started to experiment because, in the end, we are trying to follow the consumer. And, in the case of Japan, this is a relatively well-developed segment of low alcohol,” the outlet reports Coca-Cola chief executive James Quincey as saying at a shareholder meeting on April 26.

According to Fortune, the company does not currently have plans to offer more alcoholic beverages or to offer this particular beverage to a wider market. Still haven’t kicked your soda habit? These 18 facts about diet soda might finally make you stop drinking it.


Coca-Cola's first alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, now on shelves in Kyushu, Japan

Discounting its beginnings as a cocaine-and-wine concoction, and its short-lived wine arm in the 1970s, Coca-Cola largely stayed away from the business of delivering a high in its 125-year history. Till yesterday. The company has now launched its first-ever alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, in Japan.

According to AFP, the new fizzy, lemon-flavoured concoction laced with spirits seeks to capitalise on the growing popularity of "chuhai" alcopops, enjoyed especially by young Japanese women. Lemon-Do drinks - containing three, five and seven per cent alcohol - is now available only in the southern Kyushu region of Japan and a 350-millilitre can will set you back 150 yen ($1.40).

"This is a pilot project in the region which has a sizable market," said Masaki Iida, spokesman for Coca-Cola's Japanese unit. He declined to reveal the exact spirit in the drink, as this recipe is a closely guarded secret, much like the company's signature beverage. What is known, thanks to the firm's website, is that Coca-Cola's product developers got the idea after visiting Japanese-style "izakaya" pubs, where they discovered that lemon-flavoured drinks are very popular in the country.

The "chuhai" drinks that inspired Coca Cola, come in a range of flavours such as grape, strawberry, kiwi and white peach and contain vodka or a distilled, grain-based spirit called "shochu". They have been branded as the alternative beer and are quite popular with consumers who like to stay away from hard drinks. With an ever-growing number of health-conscious consumers distancing themselves from sodas and colas, even the diet cola varieties, Coca Cola has long recognised the need to diversify its portfolio.

So after flavoured vitamin water, a sports drink, Honest tea and Dasani bottled water, it has now jumped to tap the expanding "chuhai" market. But it won't be a breeze. The company is wading into an already competitive market where major Japanese companies such as Suntory, Kirin and Asahi dominate the shelves.

This is where we need to break the bad news: The company has no plans to extend the experiment beyond Japan. The Times of India previously quoted Coca-Cola Japan president Jorge Garduno saying that while it makes sense for Coca Cola to make the tipple in Japan, he does not see the release of the product elsewhere in the world. Because though many markets are becoming more like Japan, the culture in Japan is still very unique and special and that many products that are born there is likely to stay there. So to get a taste of Lemon-Do, you will have to catch a flight.

Still wondering about the cocaine link in the first paragraph? It's true. It got its name from two key ingredients: Coca leaves, which contains traces of cocaine, and the caffeine-rich kola nuts. Though the company stopped infusing the drug in the drink in the early 20th century, but as per media reports "decocainized coca leaf extract" is still very much a part of the recipe.


Coca-Cola's first alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, now on shelves in Kyushu, Japan

Discounting its beginnings as a cocaine-and-wine concoction, and its short-lived wine arm in the 1970s, Coca-Cola largely stayed away from the business of delivering a high in its 125-year history. Till yesterday. The company has now launched its first-ever alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, in Japan.

According to AFP, the new fizzy, lemon-flavoured concoction laced with spirits seeks to capitalise on the growing popularity of "chuhai" alcopops, enjoyed especially by young Japanese women. Lemon-Do drinks - containing three, five and seven per cent alcohol - is now available only in the southern Kyushu region of Japan and a 350-millilitre can will set you back 150 yen ($1.40).

"This is a pilot project in the region which has a sizable market," said Masaki Iida, spokesman for Coca-Cola's Japanese unit. He declined to reveal the exact spirit in the drink, as this recipe is a closely guarded secret, much like the company's signature beverage. What is known, thanks to the firm's website, is that Coca-Cola's product developers got the idea after visiting Japanese-style "izakaya" pubs, where they discovered that lemon-flavoured drinks are very popular in the country.

The "chuhai" drinks that inspired Coca Cola, come in a range of flavours such as grape, strawberry, kiwi and white peach and contain vodka or a distilled, grain-based spirit called "shochu". They have been branded as the alternative beer and are quite popular with consumers who like to stay away from hard drinks. With an ever-growing number of health-conscious consumers distancing themselves from sodas and colas, even the diet cola varieties, Coca Cola has long recognised the need to diversify its portfolio.

So after flavoured vitamin water, a sports drink, Honest tea and Dasani bottled water, it has now jumped to tap the expanding "chuhai" market. But it won't be a breeze. The company is wading into an already competitive market where major Japanese companies such as Suntory, Kirin and Asahi dominate the shelves.

This is where we need to break the bad news: The company has no plans to extend the experiment beyond Japan. The Times of India previously quoted Coca-Cola Japan president Jorge Garduno saying that while it makes sense for Coca Cola to make the tipple in Japan, he does not see the release of the product elsewhere in the world. Because though many markets are becoming more like Japan, the culture in Japan is still very unique and special and that many products that are born there is likely to stay there. So to get a taste of Lemon-Do, you will have to catch a flight.

Still wondering about the cocaine link in the first paragraph? It's true. It got its name from two key ingredients: Coca leaves, which contains traces of cocaine, and the caffeine-rich kola nuts. Though the company stopped infusing the drug in the drink in the early 20th century, but as per media reports "decocainized coca leaf extract" is still very much a part of the recipe.


Coca-Cola's first alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, now on shelves in Kyushu, Japan

Discounting its beginnings as a cocaine-and-wine concoction, and its short-lived wine arm in the 1970s, Coca-Cola largely stayed away from the business of delivering a high in its 125-year history. Till yesterday. The company has now launched its first-ever alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, in Japan.

According to AFP, the new fizzy, lemon-flavoured concoction laced with spirits seeks to capitalise on the growing popularity of "chuhai" alcopops, enjoyed especially by young Japanese women. Lemon-Do drinks - containing three, five and seven per cent alcohol - is now available only in the southern Kyushu region of Japan and a 350-millilitre can will set you back 150 yen ($1.40).

"This is a pilot project in the region which has a sizable market," said Masaki Iida, spokesman for Coca-Cola's Japanese unit. He declined to reveal the exact spirit in the drink, as this recipe is a closely guarded secret, much like the company's signature beverage. What is known, thanks to the firm's website, is that Coca-Cola's product developers got the idea after visiting Japanese-style "izakaya" pubs, where they discovered that lemon-flavoured drinks are very popular in the country.

The "chuhai" drinks that inspired Coca Cola, come in a range of flavours such as grape, strawberry, kiwi and white peach and contain vodka or a distilled, grain-based spirit called "shochu". They have been branded as the alternative beer and are quite popular with consumers who like to stay away from hard drinks. With an ever-growing number of health-conscious consumers distancing themselves from sodas and colas, even the diet cola varieties, Coca Cola has long recognised the need to diversify its portfolio.

So after flavoured vitamin water, a sports drink, Honest tea and Dasani bottled water, it has now jumped to tap the expanding "chuhai" market. But it won't be a breeze. The company is wading into an already competitive market where major Japanese companies such as Suntory, Kirin and Asahi dominate the shelves.

This is where we need to break the bad news: The company has no plans to extend the experiment beyond Japan. The Times of India previously quoted Coca-Cola Japan president Jorge Garduno saying that while it makes sense for Coca Cola to make the tipple in Japan, he does not see the release of the product elsewhere in the world. Because though many markets are becoming more like Japan, the culture in Japan is still very unique and special and that many products that are born there is likely to stay there. So to get a taste of Lemon-Do, you will have to catch a flight.

Still wondering about the cocaine link in the first paragraph? It's true. It got its name from two key ingredients: Coca leaves, which contains traces of cocaine, and the caffeine-rich kola nuts. Though the company stopped infusing the drug in the drink in the early 20th century, but as per media reports "decocainized coca leaf extract" is still very much a part of the recipe.


Coca-Cola's first alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, now on shelves in Kyushu, Japan

Discounting its beginnings as a cocaine-and-wine concoction, and its short-lived wine arm in the 1970s, Coca-Cola largely stayed away from the business of delivering a high in its 125-year history. Till yesterday. The company has now launched its first-ever alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, in Japan.

According to AFP, the new fizzy, lemon-flavoured concoction laced with spirits seeks to capitalise on the growing popularity of "chuhai" alcopops, enjoyed especially by young Japanese women. Lemon-Do drinks - containing three, five and seven per cent alcohol - is now available only in the southern Kyushu region of Japan and a 350-millilitre can will set you back 150 yen ($1.40).

"This is a pilot project in the region which has a sizable market," said Masaki Iida, spokesman for Coca-Cola's Japanese unit. He declined to reveal the exact spirit in the drink, as this recipe is a closely guarded secret, much like the company's signature beverage. What is known, thanks to the firm's website, is that Coca-Cola's product developers got the idea after visiting Japanese-style "izakaya" pubs, where they discovered that lemon-flavoured drinks are very popular in the country.

The "chuhai" drinks that inspired Coca Cola, come in a range of flavours such as grape, strawberry, kiwi and white peach and contain vodka or a distilled, grain-based spirit called "shochu". They have been branded as the alternative beer and are quite popular with consumers who like to stay away from hard drinks. With an ever-growing number of health-conscious consumers distancing themselves from sodas and colas, even the diet cola varieties, Coca Cola has long recognised the need to diversify its portfolio.

So after flavoured vitamin water, a sports drink, Honest tea and Dasani bottled water, it has now jumped to tap the expanding "chuhai" market. But it won't be a breeze. The company is wading into an already competitive market where major Japanese companies such as Suntory, Kirin and Asahi dominate the shelves.

This is where we need to break the bad news: The company has no plans to extend the experiment beyond Japan. The Times of India previously quoted Coca-Cola Japan president Jorge Garduno saying that while it makes sense for Coca Cola to make the tipple in Japan, he does not see the release of the product elsewhere in the world. Because though many markets are becoming more like Japan, the culture in Japan is still very unique and special and that many products that are born there is likely to stay there. So to get a taste of Lemon-Do, you will have to catch a flight.

Still wondering about the cocaine link in the first paragraph? It's true. It got its name from two key ingredients: Coca leaves, which contains traces of cocaine, and the caffeine-rich kola nuts. Though the company stopped infusing the drug in the drink in the early 20th century, but as per media reports "decocainized coca leaf extract" is still very much a part of the recipe.


Coca-Cola's first alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, now on shelves in Kyushu, Japan

Discounting its beginnings as a cocaine-and-wine concoction, and its short-lived wine arm in the 1970s, Coca-Cola largely stayed away from the business of delivering a high in its 125-year history. Till yesterday. The company has now launched its first-ever alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, in Japan.

According to AFP, the new fizzy, lemon-flavoured concoction laced with spirits seeks to capitalise on the growing popularity of "chuhai" alcopops, enjoyed especially by young Japanese women. Lemon-Do drinks - containing three, five and seven per cent alcohol - is now available only in the southern Kyushu region of Japan and a 350-millilitre can will set you back 150 yen ($1.40).

"This is a pilot project in the region which has a sizable market," said Masaki Iida, spokesman for Coca-Cola's Japanese unit. He declined to reveal the exact spirit in the drink, as this recipe is a closely guarded secret, much like the company's signature beverage. What is known, thanks to the firm's website, is that Coca-Cola's product developers got the idea after visiting Japanese-style "izakaya" pubs, where they discovered that lemon-flavoured drinks are very popular in the country.

The "chuhai" drinks that inspired Coca Cola, come in a range of flavours such as grape, strawberry, kiwi and white peach and contain vodka or a distilled, grain-based spirit called "shochu". They have been branded as the alternative beer and are quite popular with consumers who like to stay away from hard drinks. With an ever-growing number of health-conscious consumers distancing themselves from sodas and colas, even the diet cola varieties, Coca Cola has long recognised the need to diversify its portfolio.

So after flavoured vitamin water, a sports drink, Honest tea and Dasani bottled water, it has now jumped to tap the expanding "chuhai" market. But it won't be a breeze. The company is wading into an already competitive market where major Japanese companies such as Suntory, Kirin and Asahi dominate the shelves.

This is where we need to break the bad news: The company has no plans to extend the experiment beyond Japan. The Times of India previously quoted Coca-Cola Japan president Jorge Garduno saying that while it makes sense for Coca Cola to make the tipple in Japan, he does not see the release of the product elsewhere in the world. Because though many markets are becoming more like Japan, the culture in Japan is still very unique and special and that many products that are born there is likely to stay there. So to get a taste of Lemon-Do, you will have to catch a flight.

Still wondering about the cocaine link in the first paragraph? It's true. It got its name from two key ingredients: Coca leaves, which contains traces of cocaine, and the caffeine-rich kola nuts. Though the company stopped infusing the drug in the drink in the early 20th century, but as per media reports "decocainized coca leaf extract" is still very much a part of the recipe.


Coca-Cola's first alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, now on shelves in Kyushu, Japan

Discounting its beginnings as a cocaine-and-wine concoction, and its short-lived wine arm in the 1970s, Coca-Cola largely stayed away from the business of delivering a high in its 125-year history. Till yesterday. The company has now launched its first-ever alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, in Japan.

According to AFP, the new fizzy, lemon-flavoured concoction laced with spirits seeks to capitalise on the growing popularity of "chuhai" alcopops, enjoyed especially by young Japanese women. Lemon-Do drinks - containing three, five and seven per cent alcohol - is now available only in the southern Kyushu region of Japan and a 350-millilitre can will set you back 150 yen ($1.40).

"This is a pilot project in the region which has a sizable market," said Masaki Iida, spokesman for Coca-Cola's Japanese unit. He declined to reveal the exact spirit in the drink, as this recipe is a closely guarded secret, much like the company's signature beverage. What is known, thanks to the firm's website, is that Coca-Cola's product developers got the idea after visiting Japanese-style "izakaya" pubs, where they discovered that lemon-flavoured drinks are very popular in the country.

The "chuhai" drinks that inspired Coca Cola, come in a range of flavours such as grape, strawberry, kiwi and white peach and contain vodka or a distilled, grain-based spirit called "shochu". They have been branded as the alternative beer and are quite popular with consumers who like to stay away from hard drinks. With an ever-growing number of health-conscious consumers distancing themselves from sodas and colas, even the diet cola varieties, Coca Cola has long recognised the need to diversify its portfolio.

So after flavoured vitamin water, a sports drink, Honest tea and Dasani bottled water, it has now jumped to tap the expanding "chuhai" market. But it won't be a breeze. The company is wading into an already competitive market where major Japanese companies such as Suntory, Kirin and Asahi dominate the shelves.

This is where we need to break the bad news: The company has no plans to extend the experiment beyond Japan. The Times of India previously quoted Coca-Cola Japan president Jorge Garduno saying that while it makes sense for Coca Cola to make the tipple in Japan, he does not see the release of the product elsewhere in the world. Because though many markets are becoming more like Japan, the culture in Japan is still very unique and special and that many products that are born there is likely to stay there. So to get a taste of Lemon-Do, you will have to catch a flight.

Still wondering about the cocaine link in the first paragraph? It's true. It got its name from two key ingredients: Coca leaves, which contains traces of cocaine, and the caffeine-rich kola nuts. Though the company stopped infusing the drug in the drink in the early 20th century, but as per media reports "decocainized coca leaf extract" is still very much a part of the recipe.


Coca-Cola's first alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, now on shelves in Kyushu, Japan

Discounting its beginnings as a cocaine-and-wine concoction, and its short-lived wine arm in the 1970s, Coca-Cola largely stayed away from the business of delivering a high in its 125-year history. Till yesterday. The company has now launched its first-ever alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, in Japan.

According to AFP, the new fizzy, lemon-flavoured concoction laced with spirits seeks to capitalise on the growing popularity of "chuhai" alcopops, enjoyed especially by young Japanese women. Lemon-Do drinks - containing three, five and seven per cent alcohol - is now available only in the southern Kyushu region of Japan and a 350-millilitre can will set you back 150 yen ($1.40).

"This is a pilot project in the region which has a sizable market," said Masaki Iida, spokesman for Coca-Cola's Japanese unit. He declined to reveal the exact spirit in the drink, as this recipe is a closely guarded secret, much like the company's signature beverage. What is known, thanks to the firm's website, is that Coca-Cola's product developers got the idea after visiting Japanese-style "izakaya" pubs, where they discovered that lemon-flavoured drinks are very popular in the country.

The "chuhai" drinks that inspired Coca Cola, come in a range of flavours such as grape, strawberry, kiwi and white peach and contain vodka or a distilled, grain-based spirit called "shochu". They have been branded as the alternative beer and are quite popular with consumers who like to stay away from hard drinks. With an ever-growing number of health-conscious consumers distancing themselves from sodas and colas, even the diet cola varieties, Coca Cola has long recognised the need to diversify its portfolio.

So after flavoured vitamin water, a sports drink, Honest tea and Dasani bottled water, it has now jumped to tap the expanding "chuhai" market. But it won't be a breeze. The company is wading into an already competitive market where major Japanese companies such as Suntory, Kirin and Asahi dominate the shelves.

This is where we need to break the bad news: The company has no plans to extend the experiment beyond Japan. The Times of India previously quoted Coca-Cola Japan president Jorge Garduno saying that while it makes sense for Coca Cola to make the tipple in Japan, he does not see the release of the product elsewhere in the world. Because though many markets are becoming more like Japan, the culture in Japan is still very unique and special and that many products that are born there is likely to stay there. So to get a taste of Lemon-Do, you will have to catch a flight.

Still wondering about the cocaine link in the first paragraph? It's true. It got its name from two key ingredients: Coca leaves, which contains traces of cocaine, and the caffeine-rich kola nuts. Though the company stopped infusing the drug in the drink in the early 20th century, but as per media reports "decocainized coca leaf extract" is still very much a part of the recipe.


Coca-Cola's first alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, now on shelves in Kyushu, Japan

Discounting its beginnings as a cocaine-and-wine concoction, and its short-lived wine arm in the 1970s, Coca-Cola largely stayed away from the business of delivering a high in its 125-year history. Till yesterday. The company has now launched its first-ever alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, in Japan.

According to AFP, the new fizzy, lemon-flavoured concoction laced with spirits seeks to capitalise on the growing popularity of "chuhai" alcopops, enjoyed especially by young Japanese women. Lemon-Do drinks - containing three, five and seven per cent alcohol - is now available only in the southern Kyushu region of Japan and a 350-millilitre can will set you back 150 yen ($1.40).

"This is a pilot project in the region which has a sizable market," said Masaki Iida, spokesman for Coca-Cola's Japanese unit. He declined to reveal the exact spirit in the drink, as this recipe is a closely guarded secret, much like the company's signature beverage. What is known, thanks to the firm's website, is that Coca-Cola's product developers got the idea after visiting Japanese-style "izakaya" pubs, where they discovered that lemon-flavoured drinks are very popular in the country.

The "chuhai" drinks that inspired Coca Cola, come in a range of flavours such as grape, strawberry, kiwi and white peach and contain vodka or a distilled, grain-based spirit called "shochu". They have been branded as the alternative beer and are quite popular with consumers who like to stay away from hard drinks. With an ever-growing number of health-conscious consumers distancing themselves from sodas and colas, even the diet cola varieties, Coca Cola has long recognised the need to diversify its portfolio.

So after flavoured vitamin water, a sports drink, Honest tea and Dasani bottled water, it has now jumped to tap the expanding "chuhai" market. But it won't be a breeze. The company is wading into an already competitive market where major Japanese companies such as Suntory, Kirin and Asahi dominate the shelves.

This is where we need to break the bad news: The company has no plans to extend the experiment beyond Japan. The Times of India previously quoted Coca-Cola Japan president Jorge Garduno saying that while it makes sense for Coca Cola to make the tipple in Japan, he does not see the release of the product elsewhere in the world. Because though many markets are becoming more like Japan, the culture in Japan is still very unique and special and that many products that are born there is likely to stay there. So to get a taste of Lemon-Do, you will have to catch a flight.

Still wondering about the cocaine link in the first paragraph? It's true. It got its name from two key ingredients: Coca leaves, which contains traces of cocaine, and the caffeine-rich kola nuts. Though the company stopped infusing the drug in the drink in the early 20th century, but as per media reports "decocainized coca leaf extract" is still very much a part of the recipe.


Coca-Cola's first alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, now on shelves in Kyushu, Japan

Discounting its beginnings as a cocaine-and-wine concoction, and its short-lived wine arm in the 1970s, Coca-Cola largely stayed away from the business of delivering a high in its 125-year history. Till yesterday. The company has now launched its first-ever alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, in Japan.

According to AFP, the new fizzy, lemon-flavoured concoction laced with spirits seeks to capitalise on the growing popularity of "chuhai" alcopops, enjoyed especially by young Japanese women. Lemon-Do drinks - containing three, five and seven per cent alcohol - is now available only in the southern Kyushu region of Japan and a 350-millilitre can will set you back 150 yen ($1.40).

"This is a pilot project in the region which has a sizable market," said Masaki Iida, spokesman for Coca-Cola's Japanese unit. He declined to reveal the exact spirit in the drink, as this recipe is a closely guarded secret, much like the company's signature beverage. What is known, thanks to the firm's website, is that Coca-Cola's product developers got the idea after visiting Japanese-style "izakaya" pubs, where they discovered that lemon-flavoured drinks are very popular in the country.

The "chuhai" drinks that inspired Coca Cola, come in a range of flavours such as grape, strawberry, kiwi and white peach and contain vodka or a distilled, grain-based spirit called "shochu". They have been branded as the alternative beer and are quite popular with consumers who like to stay away from hard drinks. With an ever-growing number of health-conscious consumers distancing themselves from sodas and colas, even the diet cola varieties, Coca Cola has long recognised the need to diversify its portfolio.

So after flavoured vitamin water, a sports drink, Honest tea and Dasani bottled water, it has now jumped to tap the expanding "chuhai" market. But it won't be a breeze. The company is wading into an already competitive market where major Japanese companies such as Suntory, Kirin and Asahi dominate the shelves.

This is where we need to break the bad news: The company has no plans to extend the experiment beyond Japan. The Times of India previously quoted Coca-Cola Japan president Jorge Garduno saying that while it makes sense for Coca Cola to make the tipple in Japan, he does not see the release of the product elsewhere in the world. Because though many markets are becoming more like Japan, the culture in Japan is still very unique and special and that many products that are born there is likely to stay there. So to get a taste of Lemon-Do, you will have to catch a flight.

Still wondering about the cocaine link in the first paragraph? It's true. It got its name from two key ingredients: Coca leaves, which contains traces of cocaine, and the caffeine-rich kola nuts. Though the company stopped infusing the drug in the drink in the early 20th century, but as per media reports "decocainized coca leaf extract" is still very much a part of the recipe.


Coca-Cola's first alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, now on shelves in Kyushu, Japan

Discounting its beginnings as a cocaine-and-wine concoction, and its short-lived wine arm in the 1970s, Coca-Cola largely stayed away from the business of delivering a high in its 125-year history. Till yesterday. The company has now launched its first-ever alcoholic drink, Lemon-Do, in Japan.

According to AFP, the new fizzy, lemon-flavoured concoction laced with spirits seeks to capitalise on the growing popularity of "chuhai" alcopops, enjoyed especially by young Japanese women. Lemon-Do drinks - containing three, five and seven per cent alcohol - is now available only in the southern Kyushu region of Japan and a 350-millilitre can will set you back 150 yen ($1.40).

"This is a pilot project in the region which has a sizable market," said Masaki Iida, spokesman for Coca-Cola's Japanese unit. He declined to reveal the exact spirit in the drink, as this recipe is a closely guarded secret, much like the company's signature beverage. What is known, thanks to the firm's website, is that Coca-Cola's product developers got the idea after visiting Japanese-style "izakaya" pubs, where they discovered that lemon-flavoured drinks are very popular in the country.

The "chuhai" drinks that inspired Coca Cola, come in a range of flavours such as grape, strawberry, kiwi and white peach and contain vodka or a distilled, grain-based spirit called "shochu". They have been branded as the alternative beer and are quite popular with consumers who like to stay away from hard drinks. With an ever-growing number of health-conscious consumers distancing themselves from sodas and colas, even the diet cola varieties, Coca Cola has long recognised the need to diversify its portfolio.

So after flavoured vitamin water, a sports drink, Honest tea and Dasani bottled water, it has now jumped to tap the expanding "chuhai" market. But it won't be a breeze. The company is wading into an already competitive market where major Japanese companies such as Suntory, Kirin and Asahi dominate the shelves.

This is where we need to break the bad news: The company has no plans to extend the experiment beyond Japan. The Times of India previously quoted Coca-Cola Japan president Jorge Garduno saying that while it makes sense for Coca Cola to make the tipple in Japan, he does not see the release of the product elsewhere in the world. Because though many markets are becoming more like Japan, the culture in Japan is still very unique and special and that many products that are born there is likely to stay there. So to get a taste of Lemon-Do, you will have to catch a flight.

Still wondering about the cocaine link in the first paragraph? It's true. It got its name from two key ingredients: Coca leaves, which contains traces of cocaine, and the caffeine-rich kola nuts. Though the company stopped infusing the drug in the drink in the early 20th century, but as per media reports "decocainized coca leaf extract" is still very much a part of the recipe.


Watch the video: 1985: Coca-Cola launches new Coke (July 2022).


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